TitleSelecting renal replacement therapies: what do African American and non-African American patients and their families think others should know? A mixed methods study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsDePasquale, N, Ephraim, PL, Ameling, J, Lewis-Boyer, LP, Crews, DC, Greer, RC, Rabb, H, Powe, NR, Jaar, BG, Gimenez, L, Auguste, P, Jenckes, M, L Boulware, E
JournalBMC Nephrol
Volume14
Pagination9
Date Published2013 Jan 14
ISSN1471-2369
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, African Americans, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Attitude to Health, Decision Making, Family, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Needs Assessment, Patient Education as Topic, Prevalence, Renal Replacement Therapy, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

<p><b>BACKGROUND: </b>Little is known regarding the types of information African American and non-African American patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their families need to inform renal replacement therapy (RRT) decisions.</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>In 20 structured group interviews, we elicited views of African American and non-African American patients with CKD and their families about factors that should be addressed in educational materials informing patients' RRT selection decisions. We asked participants to select factors from a list and obtained their open-ended feedback.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>Ten groups of patients (5 African American, 5 non-African American; total 68 individuals) and ten groups of family members (5 African American, 5 non-African American; total 62 individuals) participated. Patients and families had a range (none to extensive) of experiences with various RRTs. Patients identified morbidity or mortality, autonomy, treatment delivery, and symptoms as important factors to address. Family members identified similar factors but also cited the effects of RRT decisions on patients' psychological well-being and finances. Views of African American and non-African American participants were largely similar.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>Educational resources addressing the influence of RRT selection on patients' morbidity and mortality, autonomy, treatment delivery, and symptoms could help patients and their families select RRT options closely aligned with their values. Including information about the influence of RRT selection on patients' personal relationships and finances could enhance resources' cultural relevance for African Americans.</p>

DOI10.1186/1471-2369-14-9
Alternate JournalBMC Nephrol
PubMed ID23317336
PubMed Central IDPMC3565884
Grant List#K23DK070757 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
3R01DK079682-03S1 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
# 5KL2RR025006 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
K23 DK094975 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
#R01DK079682 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States