TitleHigher Perceived Stress Scale scores are associated with higher pain intensity and pain interference levels in older adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsWhite, RS, Jiang, J, Hall, CB, Katz, MJ, Zimmerman, ME, Sliwinski, MJ, Lipton, RB
JournalJ Am Geriatr Soc
Volume62
Issue12
Pagination2350-6
Date Published2014 Dec
ISSN1532-5415
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Comorbidity, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Geriatric Assessment, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, New York City, Pain, Pain Measurement, Prevalence, Severity of Illness Index, Stress, Psychological
Abstract

<p><b>OBJECTIVES: </b>To determine the prevalence of bodily pain measures (pain intensity and interference) in elderly people and their relationship with Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) scores.</p><p><b>DESIGN: </b>Cross-sectional.</p><p><b>SETTING: </b>Community.</p><p><b>PARTICIPANTS: </b>A representative community sample of 578 individuals aged 70 and older (mean age 78.8, 63% female).</p><p><b>MEASUREMENTS: </b>The prevalence of pain intensity and pain interference and their relationship with PSS scores, demographic factors, past medical history, and neuropsychological testing scores were examined. Pain intensity and pain interference were measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Survey bodily pain questions.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>Bivariate analysis for pain measures showed that PSS scores, neuropsychological test scores, and medical histories were associated with pain intensity and interference. Logistic regression showed that higher PSS scores were significantly associated with greater odds of having moderate to severe pain intensity and moderate to severe pain interference (with and without the inclusion of pain intensity in the models).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION: </b>Higher PSS scores are associated with greater pain intensity and interference. In this cross-sectional analysis, directionality cannot be determined. Because perceived stress and pain are potentially modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline and other poor health outcomes, future research should address temporality and the benefits of treatment.</p>

DOI10.1111/jgs.13135
Alternate JournalJ Am Geriatr Soc
PubMed ID25516031
PubMed Central IDPMC4362541
Grant ListTL1 TR001072 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG022374 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
UL1 RR025750 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG039409 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR000086 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
R03 AG045474 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG034119 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000088 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
U01 OH010411 / OH / NIOSH CDC HHS / United States
TL1RR000087 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG012101 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG022092 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
KL2TR000088 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
K23 NS047256 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
P01 AG027734 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG025119 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U01 OH010412 / OH / NIOSH CDC HHS / United States
K23 AG030857 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P01 AG003949 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
T32 GM007288 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA013330 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
U01 OH010513 / OH / NIOSH CDC HHS / United States
UL1TR000086 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States